Early Easter at Eskdale

The weekend before Easter, we had our annual weekend at Eskdale for Johan’s mum’s birthday. We have been doing this now for the past 4 years (where has the time gone?!) and each time I fall in love with the valley a little bit more.

We are lucky enough to be able to stay with friends when we are over there (Johan’s god parents, who went to university with his mum) and I am continuously envious of their fabulous lifestyle. I have picked up a tendency to take myself away with a camera while we are visiting and shoot the surrounding fields, hills and land. Although, I often enjoy simply wandering around their gardens and shooting the wonderfully diverse flora and fauna that can be found there. They are always working on something, and have made constant improvements/changes to their land.

I always feel at peace when visiting Eskdale, it’s such a beautiful place, and I truly hope that Johan and I can emulate Peter and Fionna in our later lives.

Below is a selection of the images that I took while wandering around their house and garden, and more can be found on my Flickr page: https://flic.kr/s/aHskUEbs7k

Daffy Do ‘17

Another year gone, another slog along the side of Ullswater with a short, sharp trip up and down Hallin Fell in the middle for good measure. Slog may not quite be fair, as it’s one of my favourite runs on the calendar, but the Daffodil Run, put on by Joe Faulkner of Nav4, is a little tougher than its approximately half marathon distance may suggest. It’s not the hardest half marathon I’ve ever done, but it’s a fair stretch further than a nice flat road half…

Lucy, Brenda (Lucy’s mum), and myself all set off from Newcastle to reach Pooley Bridge for about half 10 on Saturday 18th March, which should have, in theory, given me a nice half hour or so to get registered, and final checks sorted before setting off in the mass start at 11. Once we got into the village hall for registration however, we were told that everyone was just heading out as and when, so once I was good to go, I could get shifting if I fancied.

Nipping back to the car (we’ve got a shiny new car – woohoo!) I changed into my trusty Fellraisers, got into my running shorts, and made sure I had everything I needed in my bumbag, before popping back into the village hall to let Joe and co know that I was setting off, and to record my start time. Last year, when I ran the Daffodil Run with Kip, we came in at 1h59min, so I was keen to get a faster time, and was secretly hoping for sub-1h50min.

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The start of the daffodil run is a long drag up from Pooley Bridge, onto the Ullswater Way and up to The Cockpit. Initially running on metalled roads, this soon gives way to the characteristic rocky track which makes up the majority of the run, but there’s still a little way to go before hitting The Cockpit. From The Cockpit, you’re treated to a lovely rolling descent all the way down to Howtown. Whilst you have to keep half an eye on the track, the views are spectacular! Ullswater isn’t a lake I usually head to, but with the clouds sitting high and the Helvellyn range in the background, it’s hard to beat.

Due to the non-mass-start, the running started to get really quite fun; it became a game of spotting someone in the distance and then trying to reel them in. Admittedly, I only managed to pass one quick runner on the way out, but whilst approaching the top of Hallin Fell another chap passed me on the way back down, and I knew the chase was on!

It was also a race of mixed weather; mild to start, passing to pretty damn brutal on the way from Howtown to Martindale (although the rain felt like it would pass quickly so I decided on keeping my windshirt on rather than switching to a waterproof), then to gloriously sunny pretty much as I hit the top of Hallin Fell, where I found the legendary John Bamber – a pleasant surprise to say the least. After a quick chat, and a summit photo, I said goodbye and got shifting once again, happy in the knowledge that I had a runner to chase on the way back.

A quick sip of water on the rolling top flank of Hallin Fell, and I was on my way. Descending isn’t really my forte, but this felt good – steep grassy hillside allowed for reasonable relaxation, and I arrived back at Martindale Church just as a group of walkers I had passed on the way to the church were leaving. “You’ve been all the way up and down already?” Yep, and it’s time to crack on.

Stopping for a minute or so with Jim at the food station, I downed a cup of water, inhaled a Jaffa Cake, adjusted my shoes – my foot-beds had folded up on the way downhill – and skipped off up the bank out of Martindale. I met a couple who were walking the Daffodil Run, informing them that they were almost half way through, which was met with great ‘enthusiasm’ by the lass. On the way to the main path again, I took the right-hand trod, decided that was wrong, crossed to the left hand one, and then found out that the right hand one was, in fact, the better option. Never mind! I dropped straight down to the path proper and got on my way.

I could see the guy I from the top of Hallin Fell in the distance, so I got a pace on as best as possible. You’d think that on the way back all the hard work was over – not so. The nice long rolling descent from the way out becomes a gradual uphill all the way back to the Cockpit.

Slowly, slowly, I reeled in various runners, pushing to catch up. The distance between the other runner and myself seemed to be reducing, but the uphill was making it hard to get a real pace on. Eventually, I had to accept settling into a walk/run progression, but still, ground was being gained.

Eventually, Stu Smith hove back into sight – the Cockpit, and thus the final descent, wasn’t much further. Push. Push. Push. Pass the marshal at the Cockpit (ensconced in a Nordisk Telemark II; nice tent), to hit the track and descent. My quarry had made enough ground to get away for good, but I managed to reel in a couple more people as I made my way down the hill into Pooley Bridge.

Finally, I ran by Lucy and Brenda, returning from their short outing, but kept shifting as fast as possible as the end was quite literally in sight. Trotting into the village hall, my time was recorded, and I was pointed towards tea and cake. The cake is always good on Nav4 events, it really must be said, and this time round I enjoyed and excellent fig slice.

My final time was 1h52, a 7-minute improvement on last year’s effort, but still just shy of the sub-1h50 I was aiming for. Maybe next time? I’d definitely like to run it again – it’s certainly a very well organised event, along a very enjoyable route, and with an atmosphere that I find promotes taking it at your own pace – be that full race pace, or as many families were doing, a relatively leisurely stroll. And just because it bares mentioning again, the food is cracking! Soup, cake; some of the best I’ve ever had, and what more could you want?

After a quick chat with the other runners, we headed off back to Newcastle to recover for the next day’s race (The Thrunton Thriller). My left ankle was feeling a little stiff, but overall I was happy with how it had gone, and looking forward to the next race and the rest of the season.

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Spine Challenger Recce – Day One

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What a day! Setting out from Edale in some serious mist, I headed towards my first ascent of Kinder Scout ever. Visibility was generally alright, making route finding easy enough, but annoyingly preventing any descent views of the surrounding landscape. Across Kinder and down to Snake Pass was all very atmospheric however, with tors of rock looming out of the clag like spectral sentries of the moorlands. Unfortunately (or fortunately) it’s been pretty dry recently, and Kinder Downfall was little more than a babbling brook.

From Snake Pass, the difficulties ease somewhat. There’s very little ascent or descent to speak of, and I bumped into Andy, another Spine Challengerer out on a recce. The pace down to Torside reservoir was therefore a little slower than I’d have set on my own, but it was well worth the time penalty for a good chat with another competitor to pick up some hints and tips.

Jim was waiting just south of the reservoir with a thermos of soup and freshly baked rolls. What more can a runner ask for really?

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From here it was a long drag to Black Hill; Andy has set off on his way while I was enjoying my soup, but we expected to cross paths again in the nearish future. I had a bit of a word with myself on the steep uphill to Oaken Clough, as I was getting frustrated with the slower pace I was forced into by the gradient, and realised that I probably needed more food.

A couple of friendly walkers informed me shortly after that there was another chap just 5 minutes ahead; it had taken me a little longer to catch Andy than expected, but I soon saw him cruising along ahead. A quick “how’s it going?” and I passed by to head through the most goppin’ piece of bog I’ve had the pleasure of associating with on the way up to Black Hill. The clag was still in, and a hoolie was blowing at the summit but I needed food again. Crouching behind the raised trig point, I had as much of a Chia Bar as I could stomach, and a Baby Bel for good measure, before setting off on the descent to the next rendezvous point at Wessenden Head.

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A quick chat with Jim, and a water refill (there’s actually a good river just before Wessenden Head, so this fits quite nicely with how race planning will likely go), and I foolishly followed the map into some obviously horrible terrain. I now know to head up the road a little, and go round the metalled track, rather than bashing through deep thick grass, uneven slopes and a couple of very deep river-cuts which would make even the Scottish Borders terrain proud! Bugger that on the race!

Passing by Wessenden Head, then Wessenden reservoirs, the light was beginning to fade, and the Pennine Way drops you most kindly down to a river, then brings you back up along a stream gully. What a joy in the dusk! Although I’ll secretly admit to enjoying it an odd kind of way.

Light fading fast, I decided to hold off on using my head torch for as long as possible. This made navigation a little tricky, and after I’d stumbled for the 4th time in a minute, it was time to get the head torch out.

A couple of reservoirs later (there’s a lot of reservoirs along the Pennines), we were at the penultimate rendezvous. A friendly trucker informed me that he’d ruined his knees by running too much when he was young, which was particularly constructive at that point, but it was good craic so no harm done.

Pressing on in the dark I soon found myself within a cloud, which deadened every sound, and reduced visibility to about 30m. Not too bad really, but the sheer amount of slippery peat made for an interesting mile or so. Might have been running slightly off piste there…

One final car park before the final hill of the day – White Hill – and there was a car whose alarm seemed a little faulty, going off every couple of minutes. When I got there, the issue was explained; I’m pretty sure it was some early-evening doggers looking for some strange. Once I’d walked off up the next section of the Pennine Way, the alarm mysteriously stopped sounding…

Across White Hill, the clag really came in. Visibility was down to 10m at the most! At least the path is fairly benign at this point, and rapid time was made over and down to the end of day one. I found myself thinking that if visibility was like that on the race, and snow was on the ground, navigation would be almost impossible with a map and compass. Time to brush up on those GPS skills perhaps!

A couple of thoughts or realisations from the day:

I need gaiters. Grit in the socks isn’t great, so let’s minimise that!

Brynje mesh baselayers are awesome! I know a few of my friends have been converts for years, but you have to experience it to understand just how good it really is! Used in conjunction with a Rab Vapour-Rise jacket, I spent the whole day at pretty much the correct temperature, and with my skin almost dry whilst the outside of the jacket was soaked. Working that hard, I’d usually be dripping from mile one, but not this time. Definitely a convert.

Poles help. I know, sacrilege when you’re talking to the fell running community, and I wouldn’t use poles on a fell race. But when you know you’ve got days (or lots of hours when we’re actually on the event) to go, and you’re carrying full emergency kit, they help. A lot.

As always, thanks for reading, and I’d like to extend a special thanks to Jim Imber, without whom this experience would be much more painful and difficult.

Stay tuned for the next installment ‘Spine Challenger Recce – Day Two’…coming soon.

Cragside Christmas Cracker – High Fell Events

This Sunday saw us heading up into Northumberland to take part in the Cragside Christmas Cracker; a 10 mile race (actually a fun run) organised by High Fell Events which takes the competitors around the grounds of Cragside (the first building in the world to have lighting provided by hydro electricity).

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The morning began with unexpectedly clear weather, although as it was mid-November there was still a chill in the air. Getting to the car park with about 45 minutes to go before the start, we moseyed over to registration and hung around trying to suss out the competition. As well as a number of excellent Christmas-related fancy dress runners.

It has to be mentioned that many people were out to simply enjoy the route, and were not expecting to competitive in any way. I was just aiming to get round in the best time possible, expecting to manage it in about 1 and a half to 2 hours.

We set off from the visitor centre at 9:30, heading around the lake, and back up to the main house. Heading through the courtyard, we jumped onto the trails proper which were picky from the start, full of roots and wet stones. For anyone who hasn’t experienced wet sandstone, it isn’t too far from a skating rink. Obviously not as bad, but it’s definitely light thoughts and tread softly when you’re running on it; put down too much power and your feet are going to fly out from under you.

Up, round, and down through the estate, we sampled the delights of Cragside. If you haven’t been to Cragside, I can highly recommend it; around every corner it seems a new, excellent view. Twisting paths through rhododendron bushes, small lakes, and long sets of stone steps made for interesting running.

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I’d set off towards the front of the pack, and we’d strung out pretty quickly within the first mile or so. The fastest guys disappeared pretty quickly, but that wasn’t all that surprising due to the twisting nature of the course. As it was, I didn’t really have any idea of where I was in the pack, but there was a nice group lads shifting at about the same pace, so we stuck together for much of the race.

Over the last few miles we split up; a couple heading off ahead; a couple dropping back as the techy terrain and steep hills played to my advantage; leaving me to canter along at my own pace. Within the last couple of miles I was passed by a surprise racer, almost caught him on a sharp uphill, but then got left behind on the final stretch down the forest drive.

Crossing the finish line at a fairly leisurely pace, I received a Cragside Christmas Cracker medal (my first medal, woohoo!) and congratulated all the guys who had finished and were hanging about. I then headed off to sign out and get my race t-shirt. I’d come in 7th place, which is much better than I’d expected, and as a bonus I think I got around quicker than the anticipated 1h30.

All in all, a great day out, and finished off with a brew and a cracking bacon butty.

Great!

Stanley Ghyll and Birker Force

With the OMM 2016 just round the corner, I’ve been trying to get out and about a little more to get some miles in my legs. The first run of much interest for a while took place this weekend when we went over to Eskdale to celebrate my brother and my birthdays (our birthdays are just 16 days apart).

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The original plan was to get up early and head up via Eel Tarn and Burnmoor Tarn to hit Scafell Pike, and descend back down via Scafell, Slightside and the Great Moss. I’d anticipated about 3 to 3 and a half hours for this round, which would have worked out quite nicely if I’d woken up early. But as Saturdays often work out, we ended up sleeping a little longer than expected, and by the time we were up, fed and watered the 4ish hours it would take for the run and subsequent cool down/shower would put me way out of sync with everyone else.

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Not wanting to pass up my opportunity to run in one of my favourite Lakeland valleys, I had a quick peruse of the map for a shorter route which would provide a bit of ascent and excellent views. I settled on a classic round (for us), joining the riverside path as quickly as possible from Christcliff, running down (West) to Stanley Ghyll, up Stanley Ghyll, East across the tops above Birker Force, back down to Low Birker, and back along the river.

I won’t blather on about the views, which were exceptional as always. I will be just a little nerdy, now having a running watch, and say that I was out for 56 minutes, with an average pace of 6min30/km. So now, I’ll leave you all with a few photos of my run. Enjoy!

Oh, and see you at the OMM…

 

1st / 2nd October

This weekend marked the start of October, and properly felt like Autumn was in the air. The sky was bright and blue, and the air was crisp. I love Autumn; the smells, the colours of the leaves, the chance to wear umpteen layers and all of the wool. It was also the last weekend of the Alice in Wonderland Exhibition at the Laing Art Gallery. I love this novel, and have been fascinated by all things Alice since I was a child, and so we made it the aim of the weekend to get ourselves to the exhibition – and it didn’t disappoint. We were treated to an indepth history of Lewis Carroll, and shown how he came to write Alice’s adventures; his influences, techniques and where it all began, as well as what came after the success of Carroll’s publication of his grand work.
And, of course, I bought a mug from the gift shop; depicting the Cheshire Cat, naturally.

This weekend has generally been dedicated to exploring my home city and playing with my cameras (I make no apologies for the amount of cactus spam which will be following this text…) Yesterday, I showed Johan around some of the oldest parts of the city, taking up through Stowell street, to the Chinese Gate, and along the Old City Walls. This was all topped off with a coffee at the fabulous Settle Down Cafe (I can’t understand why it’s taken me so long to visit here!)

Most of today, as I’ve already mentioned, was given to faffing about with my cameras – namely my Canon 450D. I’ve forgotten how much I love this camera, having been using others for a while, and decided to have a proper play with it today. This mainly consisted of documenting a cat turf war (between Vince and the neighbourhood cats) and taking multiple photos of my growing collection of cacti and succulents. I had a mint time faffing about with perspective and focus, taking quite a few shots of the blackberries in our garden. I appreciate that these are probably not the most exciting of subjects, but I thought I’d share my efforts with you anyway. I hope you enjoy!

We ended up paying a visit to Exhibition Park again this afternoon – its quickly becoming one of our favourite places to go for a wander (and an icecream), and we have vowed to start exploring the green places in Newcastle more, especially the Town Moor.

Sunny Sunday Stroll

I’m not sure why it’s taken me all week to put this up…blame it on post-work laziness! But anyway, we had an entirely laid back and slobby couple of days last weekend. After a busy month, it was so nice to have no plans and actually do nothing! It was also lovely to just spend some time together without rushing around. However, but the time Sunday afternoon came around, I was getting itchy feet and so we drove into town and went for a blustery, sunny stroll around Exhibition Park. It’s been ages since I’ve been up there and have been meaning to check out the newly opened Wylam Brewery for aaaaages.

After stopping off at the Cafe in the park for a coffee and a brownie, we wandered round, with me taking photos (for a change) and Johan on the search for Pokemon. After (subtly) mentioning how cool the Brewery looked, Johan suggested popping in for a pint – proper good idea. That place is amazing!